Oblong title is truth in advertising

May 26th, 2020

~~~~~

Here lies the story of Bucky McSnead / The slasher who rhymes and revels in grue / He did not see Ole Splitfoot enter the scene / A mischievous legend that grew and grew!” The presumption I made in our last post about the Memorial Day weekend being a prime time for film activity is not without basis. Twenty years ago, I spent a day at the cozy household of Mike and Sue Trippiedi in Champaign to witness the taping of a comic dispute between the lumbering Bucky McSnead (Steve Davis) and his abrasive parents (Traci Nally and Will Ridenour) that ended in murder and began a crime spree littered with many suspect couplets. I was grateful to be invited and could not wait to see the scene cut together when BUCKY McSNEAD, THE FIRST SLASHER FILM DONE IN RHYME had its debut in 2001. Slice and dice to the present, it seems inexplicable that so few horror movies originate from downstate Illinois and it always takes me by surprise when a new one is announced. After you watch the vintage trailer for the clever McSNEAD, shared by Mike Trippiedi collaborator Bill Yauch of RiellyBoy Productions in Urbana

~~~~~

~~~~~

…you can let your imagination run wild with the proposed grindhouse-style feature its creators have titled – let me catch my breath hereTHE TRUE TALE OF OLE SPLITFOOT VS. THE LESBIAN WARRIOR NUNS OF THE GREAT WHITE NORTH. Conjures up a lot of saucy and devilish possibilities, yes? Ash Hamilton and Horror-Fix Pictures of Springfield, Ben Harl and Silver Compass Studios of Decatur, and Michael Welborn and Nic White of CinemaSlice in Bay City, Michigan, believe the world needs a niche flick like this and have launched an Indiegogo campaign as of last Friday, May 22, to float a modest six-figure budget. If you want a hint at what Harl and Hamilton’s screenplay may entail, visit Indiegogo for an over-the-top teaser and this Horror-Fix.com article for their ribald sense of humor. OLE SPLITFOOT is intended to roll this November under the direction of Massimiliano Cerchi (MAYDAY) and star a number of indie horror talents along with veteran actors like Michael Paré (BONE TOMAHAWK) and Robert LaSardo (THE MULE). Peoria actress Samantha Marie (TEACHER SHORTAGE) is a co-producer.

Given that mouthful of a title and the involvement of CinemaSlice, I wonder if OLE SPLITFOOT will be filmed closer to Canada than the Illinois plains. We’ll certainly find out! Until then, a promotional poster oozes with exploitation intent below. You already know whether or not you want to scroll any further.

~ Jason Pankoke

p.s. Apologies to Damian Duffy Barely Trying for the flashback. Nuns? Guns? Beer!

~~~~~

Online panel will talk indie filming

May 22nd, 2020

~~~~~

I’m sure many a weekend warrior has gone into the Memorial Day stretch with camera in hand and team in tow so they could take advantage of three consecutive days to shoot scenes to their hearts’ content. I’m also sure many are biting their lips in frustration this Memorial Day as ongoing social distancing has thwarted their recent plans. Since there are many aspects to the filmmaking process that can still be practiced while stuck at home such as increasing one’s working knowledge of it, the Central Illinois Film Commission has stepped up with a useful alternative. The Springfield group is hosting a panel discussion via Zoom tomorrow, Saturday, May 23, 1-2:30 p.m., called “Microbudget Filmmaking in Central Illinois” and it will be moderated by Laura Richter of Spencer Films, also based in the capital city. Each hour is to be punctuated by a major “p” of how a movie comes together – pre-production, production, post-production – and delve into subtopics that every media storyteller might want to better understand. Guests in the program include John Isberg of Swede Films in Urbana, Kimberly Conner of Predestined Arts & Entertainment in Springfield, and Ben Harl of Silver Compass Studios in Decatur, all of whom have genre features in the works – a throwback slasher, a contemporary thriller, and a comedy-horror pastiche, respectively – that will commence filming when pandemic restrictions are eased enough to allow all the logistics to come together. Click here to read the Facebook event outlining details about the panel. This follows a similar outreach led by Isberg for his Workshop Films Collective in which he connects members and speakers every week using Zoom to keep them engaged. If you are also interested in how the Chicagoland film community is processing the shutdown, a similar Zoom session cosponsored by Independent Film Alliance Chicago and the Chicago International Film Festival, “Indie Film Town Hall,” will go live next Thursday, May 28, from 12 to 1 p.m. A recording of that will be shared on YouTube.

~ Jason Pankoke

~~~~~

Calendar: May 22-28, 2020

May 22nd, 2020

Our movie and media Calendar appears every Friday/Saturday on C-U Blogfidential and caters to the downstate region anchored by Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, USA.

~~~~~

MILESTONES | Happy Birthday to You!

5/25: David Gracon, Ph.D. (assistant professor of integrated media, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA)
5/26: Lana Hinshaw-Klann (photojournalist, WBBM Channel 2 (CBS), Chicago, IL)

 

PASSINGS | You Will Be Missed

5/14: David Warner, 64 (broadcast engineer, WCIA-TV Channel 3 (CBS)/Nexstar, Champaign, IL, retired)

 

NOW PLAYING | Champaign-Urbana Area

@ AMC Champaign 13, Champaign, IL
Closed for the week.

@ Family Video, Champaign-Urbana, IL
ONWARD, THE WAY BACK, BRAHMS: THE BOY II, EMMA., DOWNHILL, JUSTICE LEAGUE DARK: APOKOLIPS WAR, BEHIND YOU, FEAR THE WALKING DEAD (s5), more! (5/19 on)

@ Goodrich Savoy 16, Savoy, IL
Closed for the week.

Events featuring locally produced movies are marked with an asterisk (*). Additional “Now Playing” and “Coming Soon” listings appear after the jump!

~~~~~ Read the rest of this entry »

Odds sinking for Lincoln survival

May 20th, 2020

~~~~~

Two months ago when I wrote with dramatic resign that certain markers of our film culture in downstate Illinois were being “allowed to simply crumble down,” I had no clue that would come to pass so literally and quickly. Articles run by the Decatur Herald & Review last week report on how the city is crisis managing a sign of architectural aging and cultural stagnation. The video posted in this piece shows evidence of fallen bricks littering an alleyway behind the Lincoln Square Theatre, implication being the damage is new and could hurt passersby, along with notices giving the property owners 30 days to repair the exterior or face the threat of demolition. Decatur mayor Julie Moore Wolfe and other city officials claim in a follow-up piece they don’t want to tear it down and are struggling to find anyone representing its last owner, a non-profit formed in the 1990s and dissolved early in 2019 after the most recent shuttering of its doors. This new hiccup follows an ongoing series of setbacks and stalled promise that has faced various boards and management teams doing their best to revive the Lincoln at 141 N. Main Street in downtown Decatur, which ceased to be a first-run movie house in December 1980. H&R coverage of the Lincoln often focuses on talk of budget shortfalls, renovation needs, and an inability to fundraise and spend effectively, the repetition broken now and again by successful events such as a “100th Birthday Bash” staged in October 2016. It may be long overdue for the Decatur community to decide whether they can get behind one more push to restore the Lincoln as a multi-use venue and entertainment destination or if building something fresh from the ground up is the wise choice. Preserving a historic structure is an expensive process requiring years of dedication, although the Lincoln’s future stewards have nearby success stories to study: the Virginia in Champaign, the Normal in Normal, the Fischer in Danville, and the Lorraine in Hoopeston. Good luck to the Soy Capital folks on the tough decisions they must make.

~ Jason Pankoke

~~~~~

Calendar: May 15-21, 2020

May 15th, 2020

Our movie and media Calendar appears every Friday/Saturday on C-U Blogfidential and caters to the downstate region anchored by Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, USA.

~~~~~

MILESTONES | Happy Birthday to You!

5/19: Gerry Kissell (conceptual artist, Panoramic Pictures, Pontiac, MI)
5/21: Katherine Bokenkamp (cover model, C-U Confidential #10)

 

PASSINGS | You Will Be Missed

3/30: Ron Torregrossa, 69 (camera technician, Publication Services, Champaign, IL, retired)

 

MFHQ MEMO | From Chambana Mendota with Love Further Concessions

It’s safe to say that fresh-air screenings will have a resurgence this summer, based on the weekly waves of ozoners being opened across the country. Starting their season tonight is the Route 34 Drive-In of Earlville, a Calendar constant and the one closest to where MFHQ Remote is currently situated; be sure to follow the link after this paragraph to access their website and observe instructions on how to prepare and conduct yourselves for a visit. Such a development is great for business and diversion as long as federal and state guidelines are being followed by customers and staff, but it doesn’t necessarily help all the brick-and-mortar theaters left in the lurch. Every day is a good day to haunt your favorite movie house’s internet accounts to learn if there are ways to support them financially. A popular promotion at several area theaters as of late is curbside popcorn sales. The Lincoln Family Theatre & Community Center in Lincoln will hold their monthly “popcorn day” tonight, Friday, May 15, from 5 to 7 p.m. in their lobby. The Avon Theatre in Decatur is offering several house-made “Mr. Popcorn” flavors along with drinks and gift certificates for the fourth weekend in a row tomorrow, Saturday, May 16, from 12 to 3 p.m. in a park-and-wait scenario. The Lorraine Theatre in Hoopeston has a program every Saturday from 5 to 8 p.m. where patrons call in during that time period to have their orders made for immediate pick-up or to be delivered in person by the reigning “Miss Hoopeston,” Asti Scharlach, with some proceeds going to charity. The Onarga Theater in Onarga and Princess Theatre in LeRoy organized similar promotions in recent weeks and may be intending to do so again. Pairing their goodies with streaming at home will make you feel like a million bucks for encouraging your local exhibitors to keep it going. Bravo!

@ Route 34 Drive-in, Earlville, IL
ONWARD, SPIES IN DISGUISE (5/15-5/17)

 

NOW PLAYING | Champaign-Urbana Area

@ AMC Champaign 13, Champaign, IL
Closed for the week.

@ Family Video, Champaign-Urbana, IL
BIRDS OF PREY, THE CALL OF THE WILD, THE PHOTOGRAPH, FANTASY ISLAND, VIVARIUM, SHAMELESS (s10), NARCOS: MEXICO (s1), more! (5/12 on)

@ Goodrich Savoy 16, Savoy, IL
Closed for the week.

Events featuring locally produced movies are marked with an asterisk (*). Additional “Now Playing” and “Coming Soon” listings appear after the jump!

~~~~~

Read the rest of this entry »

Cicadas fashioned to fit allegory

May 14th, 2020

~~~~~

My review posted here at C-U Blogfidential last week about the Kim Adelman short-filmmaking book got me to thinking about things, just like we are wont to do. Three of them happen to be the three films-of-sorts I attempted to produce during the MICRO-FILM era. One is the one that leaves me longing in its unfinished state, another had its moment to flicker in the local underground, and the last I have yet to bring up on this forum until now. Not unlike what inspired a similar article from last spring, I uncovered a piece of artwork from the mystery movie while sorting through old files in support of other content. The visual artifact is of a time when I fancied myself a late bloomer, witnessing the deluge of output from young people as I did on a regular basis thanks to MF and the Freaky Film Festival, which I thought unique enough to share for my kicks and your inspection. Here we go, 15 years after the fact…

Long-time friends and comrades in culture know I am the antithesis of a snappy dresser, but I forced myself to put on a style hat and conceptualize what a pair of figure abstracts might look like for a Super 8 lark I began filming in the late summer of 2004. The footage I did manage to capture – we’ll get to a chemically-imbalanced caveat in a few moments – featured the awesome Amy Rund wandering about her ennui as depicted by southwest Champaign foliage and the sunken garden at the University of IllinoisAllerton Park near Monticello. What catches her attention is the shell of a cicada nymph left clinging to tree bark. Since this is typically the most that us humans witness when the insect molts from adolescent to adult, her character is supposed to enter a trance showing it in an anthropomorphized way.

How should we accomplish such a sequence, then, without being cheekily literal or gruesomely visceral? I did not have anyone specific in mind when I drew my initial ideas. Amy and I believed that casting younger for someone with experience in performance might be the best route, with the implication being her character is flashing back to a transformative moment in her past. I wondered if two actors might bring more range to the before/after dichotomy on screen and allow for both to be present in that precise moment when one supersedes the other. I also wished to avoid the potential headache of handling makeup effects in an outdoor setting, so I ultimately counted on attainable fashion sense and deliberate choreography to bring this to life in the spirit of the popular “dance on camera” genre.

~~~~~

~~~~~

You may now click on the thumbnail above to view the entire art board. Pairing drab and cold dress next to blue-green couture is an obvious conceit to signify the stages, while my imaginary models are distinct in their postures and facial forms to reflect my casting intentions. One performer certainly could have worked for both if they were adventurous enough; I imagined any possible talent to be connected to faculty or upperclassmen who might take on the opportunity to shape how they moved through frame. I probably would have scattered flashes of them through the early Amy scenes and then let it all unfold before a denouement picturing our lead walking towards a welcoming expanse as in her future. Maybe it wasn’t the most sophisticated approach to addressing a middle-age yearning – the entire concept rested on a whim instead of a script – but it might have made for something a bit sensually different.

We did not get much further with the project. Other than the partly improvised Super 8 scenes and 35mm still photographs of Amy in the locations, I captured some interesting shots across a two-day period of a nymph shedding its skin and emerging as an adult. Thank goodness my camera had a macro lens! Then again, to this day I still don’t know if it worked despite how it looked through the eyepiece. I never had the footage developed and that, as I’ve now seen firsthand, was a big mistake. Based on a recent experience with the patient Anke Voss of the Champaign County Historical Archives, I learned that black-and-white Tri-X reversal film cartridges I exposed a year before the cicada rolls had retained a definite image while Kodachrome 40 cartridges exposed at that same time produced a near blank. One can make out the ghostly impression of downtown Champaign in the latter if one squints hard enough.

The chemistry of Kodak’s color home movie stock is clearly unstable with age and I should not have hesitated in getting my rolls processed. Stored safely but not refrigerated at the Secret MICRO-FILM Headquarters, five of the nine cartridges are probably ruined. I don’t know that it’s worth the bother to find out if Amy and the cicada survived the Kodachrome threshold, considering how much costlier it is in 2020 to develop and transfer films than in 2004. Conversely, I might send off the remaining Tri-X and Plus-X reels to see what exactly the negatives have preserved for us like invertebrates in ash-hued amber. I know that I squandered the original potential for CICADA SONG, a title that I’ve attached to it in the ensuing years since we frolicked in the fields to film, although it still has a story to impress upon us.

~ Jason Pankoke

~~~~~

CUBlog open to resuming CUZine

May 11th, 2020

~~~~~

Good afternoon, curators of filmic deep thoughts! I’m feeling the itch to publish a new C-U Confidential digest this year. Would you be up for some fresh ink? If so, it will come to you at a price, so to speak. I’m pretty convinced that I should take CUZine to a print-on-demand service, given how much of a struggle we had to reach the extended fundraising goal for issue 10 so I could afford the traditional print run. Going a new route ends the placement of CUZine for free in local establishments and at events, thereby compromising my philosophy of making it as widely available as possible to Champaign-Urbana, yet it may also be liberating in some aspects. I’ll strive to price future issues within reason so I can cover manufacturing costs and stipends for certain bells and whistles, setting aside the remainder to invest in a return to mass quantity down the line. An upside is the issues can be longer. I want to engage with guest writers to fill CUZine #11 with cool and relevant material since it is the de facto 10th anniversary issue, never mind the fact we reached said anniversary on the calendar in 2017. Hit me at cuconfidential [at] gmail [dot] com if you are interested in receiving prompts for submissions. Until I get my bearings on this front, enjoy a bonus celebratory badge featuring the lovely Drea Aarons in her guise from the cover of issue 10. Enlarge it with a click to copy, paste, and share. Stay safe and Confidential, agents!

~ Jason Pankoke

NAFF website indefinitely closed

May 11th, 2020

~~~~~

Good morning, creatures of good cultural habits! Hate to be the bearer of sad news, even if I’ve been dropping hints in articles and posts about it lately, but I can verify the eight-year run of the New Art Film Festival’s official website has come to a tentative end. Maintained by our gracious friends and sponsors at ThirdSide, the site served as a sort of companion barometer to C-U Blogfidential that introduced visitors to the wide world of our self-made cinema in its own way. Since the festival is currently dormant, so is ThirdSide’s obligation to trade their service. If you attempt to access it at newartfilmfestival [dot] com, the redirect will gently port you over to the Facebook presence. (You can click on the “darkened theater” screen grab above to open up one final look, if you wish.) Not enough to curb your NAFF withdrawal? We’ll always have its YouTube archive and its composite history added here just last month. I will share announcements on all fronts should we have movement with the NAFF in the future. Always feel invited to float ideas or pitch actions the way of your humble program director at newartfilmfestivalcu [at] gmail [dot] com. In my cinematic heart, I believe the NAFF deserves a more constructive and honorable ending than where we’ve arrived. It would be exponentially nice to learn the Champaign-Urbana community feels the same with or without an operational Art Theater in tow. Please exercise those good cultural habits and give attention to the region’s other film programs that I recently discussed. Thanks much!

~ Jason Pankoke

Calendar: May 8-14, 2020

May 7th, 2020

Our movie and media Calendar appears every Friday/Saturday on C-U Blogfidential and caters to the downstate region anchored by Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, USA.

~~~~~

MFHQ MEMO | From Chambana Mendota with Love Concessions

Theatrical screening resumes this weekend in downstate Illinois with two of the ozoners we regularly list on the Calendar, Springfield’s Route 66 Drive-In and Gibson City’s Harvest Moon Twin Drive-In. They are now being allowed to have customers on their grounds as long as they adhere to a laundry list of restrictions designed to protect both employees and moviegoers. Part of this process includes limiting the total number of cars per screening and requiring patrons to stay in their cars with few exceptions. From these major concessions on down, please be mindful of every single one, folks. There is a very empathic movement to support local businesses, but it does little good if individuals take it upon themselves to put their people in danger and owners in hot water with careless actions and selfish attitude. Repeat after me: “When in doubt, don’t be an asshole.” They will hardly expect you to have everything memorized to a tee the first time you motor past the vacant ticket booth this season. (Why vacant? Because until further notice, you need to preorder tickets to both reserve your space and affect a contactless transaction.) If they give you reminders during your drive-in evening, however, follow them promptly. We need to live alongside our friends and neighbors knowing full well that any one of us can get sick from the virus at any time until we have a widely-available vaccine injected into our systems. This includes all workers interacting with the public. Enjoy the drive-in experience smartly. Go as prepared as you can, especially for the sake of your children loaded in the back seats. If you don’t feel comfortable despite the precautions, it is absolutely no social demerit on you if you stay away. And, if you decide to try this at home, then it’s all on you for making sure everyone departs happy and well. To learn more about where the operators of the Harvest Moon and Route 66 stand, you can click on the links immediately below to hit their respective websites and read up on the changes. Finally, I’d like to wish a happy anniversary to C-U Blogfidential friend Tyler Tharpe on behalf of the Centerbrook Drive-In, which opened on March 2, 1950, near Martinsville, Indiana. Here’s to 70 more years under the stars!

@ The Harvest Moon Twin Drive-in, Gibson City, IL
TROLLS WORLD TOUR (Screen 1), ONWARD (Screen 2) (5/8 on)

@ Route 66 Twin Drive-in, Springfield, IL
TROLLS WORLD TOUR (Screen 1), THE INVISIBLE MAN (Screen 2) (5/8 on)

@ The Centerbrook Drive-In, Martinsville, IN
BLOODSHOT, FANTASY ISLAND (5/8-5/9)

 

NOW PLAYING | Champaign-Urbana Area

@ AMC Champaign 13, Champaign, IL
Closed for the week.

@ Family Video, Champaign-Urbana, IL
BLOODSHOT, GRETEL & HANSEL, I STILL BELIEVE, THE JESUS ROLLS, ORDINARY LOVE, ARKANSAS, THE LODGE, RAY DONOVAN (s7), more! (5/5 on)

@ Goodrich Savoy 16, Savoy, IL
Closed for the week.

Events featuring locally produced movies are marked with an asterisk (*). Additional “Now Playing” and “Coming Soon” listings appear after the jump!

~~~~~

Read the rest of this entry »

MWP home to ‘Shorts’ whisperer

May 6th, 2020

~~~~~

It’s time to make that first film in short order, storytellers! In the third of a series, we turn our attention to Michael Wiese Productions of Studio City, California, a premier publisher since 1976 of trade books that cover various aspects of motion picture development, production, and distribution. The imprint’s founder, Michael Wiese, is a native of Urbana and contributes to the company from his home in Cornwall, England. Once a month for the next few months, we will share with you a brand-new review of a choice title from their catalog to demonstrate the breadth of subject matter.

Our next title is the third edition of Making It Big in Shorts by Kim Adelman, published by MWP in January 2017. I appreciate the demeanor and humor used in this guidebook to encourage budding film directors to embrace self-confidence and a sense of adventure when getting down to business. The author leans generously on her many years’ worth of experience to point out how young creators can infuse their early work with a unique voice and marketability. Take the shortest path to Making It Big in Shorts on the MWP website or purchase it through Amazon, while you can enjoy a podcast conversation between Adelman and host Ian O’Neill on an episode of How They Did It: Filmmaking from a year ago.

Condensed versions of the set will be collected in a MWP feature that we are planning for an upcoming issue of C-U Confidential. Please keep an eye out for our next entry in the series!

~ Jason Pankoke

~~~~~

Making It Big in Shorts: The Ultimate Filmmaker’s Guide to Short Films, 3rd edition
By Kim Adelman

Michael Wiese Productions
Paperback, 160 pages, $16.95 SRP

I have a confession to make. Years ago, Michael Wiese presented a seminar on developing story at the University of Illinois’ Illini Union the weekend of Roger Ebert’s Film Festival. He kindly let me pick a MWP book from his display in the back of the conference room. Glancing over the volumes filled with oodles of expert content, a particular choice felt like a one-stop shop bent on helping me better understand all the steps involved with the filming process and inspiring me to take an honest gamble on the same. Making It Big in Shorts, a relatively new release then using The Ultimate Filmmaker’s Guide to Short Films as its title, went home with me. I looked at it. I looked through it. I read patches of prose on various stages in the life of a film project. I never read it from cover to cover, though. I couldn’t tell you why if I tried my hardest. I can tell you it has remained in my library ever since.

Many personal benchmarks and zero completed shorts later, I have circled back and read the most recent edition of Making It Big in Shorts. I’m not sure whether the sage advice and pointed lessons of author Kim Adelman have stoked me enough to follow through on my older aspirations, but I understand why this book can be empowering in the hands of those chomping at the bit to make movies today. She brings credibility to what she says in terms of dreams, goals, and realistic expectations, never hesitating to reference her varied career for examples. Past a four-year stint producing short subjects with up-and-coming talent for the precursor to the FX network, Adelman has parlayed her championing of the format into teaching at UCLA Extension, speaking at seminars and on conference panels, writing for various outlets, and co-founding programs to highlight women and other needed voices in film.

Making It Big in Shorts is certainly reflective of Adelman’s high energy and positive vibe. Two mantras expressed throughout the text, “you are the studio” and “shorter, faster, cheaper,” describe the mindset she would prefer the serious reader-filmmaker to adopt. If one is looking to build a career, produce interesting and appealing shorts that people want to see and won’t break their bank. If one wants to experiment and gauge their own interest, keep the same considerations at the forefront. Ten chapters move quickly like a roller coaster of cascading advice as there are no sidebars to distract or appendices to claw through. Nuggets of truth include: plan early and thoroughly, ask often for free, raise funds for the rest, keep a paper trail, treat collaborators well, give proper credit, and use every device possible to convince the world you and your short are fire! They pack a slim and stylish volume that is itself “shorter, faster, cheaper,” clocking in at 100 pages less than the original 2004 edition.

While some may grumble at the lack of detail afforded certain aspects of the filmmaking process, the primary goal here is to inspire and demystify. Aiding this cause are veteran directors, former students, festival programmers, and other Adelman contacts who provide anecdotes on the value of short-form film. In addition, a foreword from cinema underdog Mark Borchardt of AMERICAN MOVIE fame reiterates the need to stay true to one’s self when navigating a medium outside the industry at large. Every section, including ones with blunt objectives like “Seven Secrets for Success” and “Ten Essential How-To’s,” is built to hype the reader like an exhilarating pep talk. For these reasons and more, Making It Big in Shorts is the kind of book one pours through attentively before making their first film and then dog-ears with successive skims in parallel with every early film journey on which they embark.

~ Jason Pankoke

~~~~~

~~~~~

Review © 2020 Jason Pankoke.

Graphics: courtesy Michael Wiese Productions
Thank you to Ken Lee of MWP for his assistance and kind words!

 

Back to the fore, MacDuff…

Visit the Review Index

Return to Home Page